Brake Time

If you’re new to bicycle maintenance or haven’t replaced your own brake pads before this is for you. Many people are unsure of when their brakes are going out or what signs to look for so they don’t completely lose braking power. You wouldn’t let your car get to this point of brake loss, so don’t let your bike get there either!

This time of year one of the most common repairs we do is brake replacement or adjustment. Riding on the wet cement can mean longer braking times and more wear on your pads. Not cleaning winter road grit off of your tire and brake pads can also greatly decrease the life and effectiveness of your pads.

If your brakes look like this, come see us.

You can check your brake pads at home by yourself just looking at them. If you don’t want to change them yourself this will give you a better idea of when to bring your bike to a mechanic to have them help. You should check your brakes periodically to keep an eye on the wear so you know where they are at.

Here are some new brakes (bottom) compared to some used brakes.

The brakes below are an example of brakes that are worn but still have some life left in them.

There are four main types of brakes.

Road Caliper Brakes are most commonly found on road, race, and touring bikes


Cantilever Brakes are most commonly found on touring, cyclocross, and old mountain bikes.

Linear Pull/V-Brake are most commonly found on city bikes, hybrids, and mountain bikes.

Disc Brakes are most commonly found on mountain bikes, a few cyclocross bikes, and hybrid bikes.

Some times of brake pads are interchangeable between the different types of brakes but most are not.

Brake pad adjustments or replacements are $5 per wheel in labor and pads run from $4-16 per pair at Crank.

We are open Monday-Saturday 9AM-6PM.

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